FAQs

What happens at the Review Board meeting?

During the average 40 minutes allowed for the review, the focus will be on the progress being made on the issues of concern raised in the Case Permanency Plan.  Each person present will be...

Why should I come to a Review Board meeting?

During the average 40 minutes allowed for the review, the focus will be on the progress being made on the issues of concern raised in the Case Permanency Plan.  Each person present will be...

Who receives the Board's Recommendations?

The FCRB reports, with recommendations, are sent to the juvenile court judge. Copies of the report are also sent to the parents, the foster parents, counselors, attorneys, the supervising agency...

What if I disagree with the Board's Recommendations?

Be sure to attend any court hearings concerning the child, contact your attorney, and make your opinions known.

What is a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA)?

A CASA Advocate is a volunteer who steps forward to advocate and serves the best interest of children of have been judged Child In Need of Assistance (CINA) by the juvenile court.  The Advocate...

How do CASA Advocates help children?

CASA Advocates go through specialized training and are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for abused and neglected children; to promote their best interests, well-being and act as a...

Who are CASA Advocates?

Last year, nationwide, more than 76,000 CASA and guardian ad litem (GAL) volunteers helped more than 251,000 abused and neglected children find safe permanent homes. CASA Advocates are everyday...

What is a Foster Care Review Board (FCRB)?

A Foster Care Review Board is a county-based panel of 5 to 7 trained volunteers, who care about the welfare of Iowa’s foster children.  Our responsibilities include conducting scheduled reviews...

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Printed from the Iowa Child Advocacy Board website on October 18, 2017 at 1:36pm.